Money flows out of Eurozone

Yesterday’s financial markets spoke volumes about where the world see’s the safest place for its money. The S&P broke above the 2000 mark for the first time in its history, buoyed by a surge in Biotech stocks and noises from the Fed that an end to their money printing and low interest rates are here to stay due to low inflation figures and stubbornly high unemployment. Money also flowed in the other direction, as the Hog Kong index reach 25,166.91 points, its highest since the financial crash of 2008.

The fact that these two indices did so well just as the Eurozone suffers yet another stumbling block, in the collapse of the French government, shows that the Eurozone is not seen as an ideal place for investment at the current time.